Gradient shawl in progress

I’m ignoring the loose loopy-ness on my pink gradient shawl that I showed you a couple of days ago, assuming it will work out in the blocking, and forging on ahead with a lace design.  Here is what it looked like before I frogged some of it. The top stitch pattern didn’t look right, but I ended up with the same results again, so I have modified the stitch pattern to suit my needs.

This photo depicts one and a half lace stitch patterns here, inspired by Barbara Walker’s A Treasury of Knitting Patterns, but modified from their originals to suit my stitch-count purposes.  Whenever this design turns into a pattern, I will be charting them, because as you know, knitters fall into two camps, but we ought to all be in the charted lace camp!

Do you prefer charts or written directions?

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Frogging blues

I got into a gradient groove and pulled out my “Xenon” colorway of Freia Ombre Lace, which I loved when I knitted the Dew Drops Shawl a couple of years ago.

The idea I had was to use the construction of my Lunar Eclipse shawl to make a laceweight version, and with this yardage, I would have a larger product and more options to develop a wider edging.  But this yarn does not want to be a garter stitch crescent shawl.

It turns out that the method I used for increasing, which doesn’t include adding any give at the ends of the rows, works in a heavier weight smaller shawl to create that crescent shape.  But when I tried to add a number of additional rows, given this yarn is three times the length (or more) of previous versions, the inner curve becomes too circular.

Maybe this is an interesting design element to explore, but it wasn’t working for me, so I frogged the shawl.  I think I have frogged it three times so far.

So I switched to a traditional triangular shawl construction that I plan to knit in stockinette with a lace edging.  When I worked the Dew Drops Shawl, I had no problems with the final result, having used the prescribed method* for adding yarn give on the edge so there isn’t unnecessary pull fighting with the shape when blocking.

This time around, though, the result seems to be extra loose and loopy.

This needle is a size up from the one I used before, but the result should still be proportional.  Over the weekend, I pulled my needle out of this false start, but then I reconsidered, picked up the stitches again, and for now I am plugging along.

What will this shawl’s fate be?  Uncertain so far.  I’d like to add my own lace edging and pop out another pattern.

*The secret is using a yarnover at the beginning of every row, then dropping it before working the remaining stitches.

What is your go-to shawl construction?

I’m lichen it!

I come from a family of punsters, so even though I probably could help myself, I shamelessly choose not to.

This project didn’t even last me until the true start of my vacation.  I finished it as I was stepping off the plane in Porto, since as is typical for me, I stayed awake through three movies instead of going to sleep.

(I mean come on, it’s only a six-hour flight, which is barely enough time to get settled and fed and watch some media before they want you to eat breakfast! I usually do the less than smart thing and stay awake until the last 30 minutes of my trans-Atlantic flights.)

This time around, after frogging my first attempt and deciding to orient the colors in the opposite direction, I achieved the intended result.  [Blocking still needed…]

Pattern: Lunar Eclipse

Yarn: Freia Ombre Sport

Colorway: Lichen

Ravelry project page: Lichen

Notes: I pushed the envelope to get the most out of this gradient yarn as I could, so I added four or five ridges on to the written pattern instructions before beginning the initial edging triangle.

Lunar Eclipse

Today is the 2nd anniversary of the release of my Lunar Eclipse pattern!  It is exciting to have designed something that over 850 people favorited, and almost 800 people have downloaded.  I know there aren’t many FOs up on Ravelry, but the pattern is out there.

This week I picked up a ball of Freia Ombre Sport from my stash pile and asked myself why I hadn’t knitted with it yet.  A while back, I knitted this shawl and had wanted to do it in the Lichen colorway, but it wasn’t available.  I love the South Beach colorway as well, but Lichen was speaking to me, so I purchased the sport weight and let it marinate in my stash for a while.

Having knit this yarn up into Lunar Eclipse a couple times already, it may seem silly to do another one, but it is so quick and fun!  This time, I had to follow my own instructions, since it has been a couple of years since I designed it.  That was an interesting experience to be sure, finding out whether I understand my own instructions.  So far, so good.

The Brisket Cable has been neglected in my versions of this scarf so far, so this time I’m making sure to include it.

Happy July 4th!

  1. Pendant Stole
  2. Garden Shawl
  3. Fountain Pen Shawl

 

I don’t have anything special planned for today, and it has been a particularly wet weekend here, so I haven’t joined any of the community outdoor activities either.

But I began watching the “John Adams” miniseries, and while I don’t often feel particularly patriotic, the luxury of living in a free nation I suppose, it makes a big difference to watch a version of history that makes it real.  I feel more connected when I can connect to historical figures through their characters as they are represented on the screen, and to understand the reality of their daily circumstances in the months and years leading up to independence from Britain.

Of course, every account, especially one presented on the screen, is biased and fictionalized to some extent, but I believe that we can learn a lot from fiction, too, and many fiction writers write to teach and to convey a message.  In this case, it is to understand in a way that allows me to put myself in the shoes of some of these historical figures the reasons that they needed to express in a document the truths they held to be self-evident.

Having lived in countries in which people are less free, I know the struggle is important.  In this day and age, we as Americans are still struggling to ensure that these truths, about the rights of humans, that our forefathers held to be self-evident, are manifested in each citizen’s reality, regardless of race, ethnicity, sex, gender, religion or sexual orientation.

So it seems a little disingenuous to me to say “Happy” July 4th, but perhaps “July 4th observed and the struggle continued” is more appropriate to echo my sentiments.  Not as catchy, I realize…

Are you celebrating the 4th?  How are you connecting with the historical significance of the day?

 

Dew Drops Shawl in Freia Handpaints Ombre Lace

Process knitter is the term people use for someone like me, I guess: I love to knit, but sometimes the finished product is not the motivation.  So, at any given time, I have 5, 10, or 20 projects on the needles, all in different stages of completion.  Over the past few months I have not been very disciplined in completing projects that were not intended for special events or holidays, but I’ve been on a tear recently to make some projects that had reached the bind-off stage actually wearable.  This past week has resulted in the blocking of four projects already, and there is a fifth underway.

Today I want to show you the project that made me fall in love with Freia Handpaints laceweight.  Originally I saw the Dew Drops Shawl worked up in the lichen colorway at Looped DC.  Sadly for me, Lichen was not available, so I chose South Beach instead.

 

Ravelry project link

I really love how this turned out.  The yarn feels magnificent, stretchy and cozy all at once, but also substantial: I’m not worried about wearing this shawl out and about because I know it can stand up to the wear.  It won’t have to be a special occasion item.  There was so much stretch that I could have taken the top border beyond the edges of my blocking board if I’d had the space.  As it is, the top edge is about 68″ across, and the point of the triangle is deep enough to cover my back, which will be fantastic for any trips to drafty or high-AC restaurants.

As I was knitting, my cat spent a lot of time with me.  I would gaze into his eyes to reassure him of my love – because after 11 years, he’s still a little insecure at times – and I realized that this colorway mirrors his face.  He has an orange-pink nose, blue-green eyes, and light- to medium-grey stripes.  People often comment on his beautiful markings, but he hasn’t let it go to his head because he’s the sweetest cat ever.

IMG_0645

Lunar Eclipse – free pattern download!

Over the past few months, I’ve been working off and on on this pattern, Lunar Eclipse, which has been a really fun exercise in what to do with one skein of luxurious yarn.

From the Mountain asked me to design something with a skein of their worsted weight cashmere, which is hand-spun in a fair-trade agreement with Afghan women.  The stuff is beautiful.  It is a soft, two-ply fiber in a variety of natural colors, including ecru, grey, and several shades of brown.

The final result was this initial offering:


 

And then Abby asked me to add two additional edgings:

You could add your own edgings to this template – we’ve offered it in three charted patterns, two originally from Barbara Walker and one from Book 4 of The Stitch Collection by Lark Books.

This is a free Ravelry download, so feel free to share, and please post your final project photos!

Garden Shawl FTW! and, a question on yarn substitution

I just found out that my Garden Shawl won a second prize in the Skein and Garment Competition at SAFF. I’m not sure which category? (Design: Evelyn Clark. Yarn: Avillion Farm.)

And what better prize for knitters than skeins of yarn! I can’t wait to find out what it looks like. [Thanks Elaina!]

Here’s my yarn substitution question, which is kind of specific – if you are familiar with Ella Rae Silkience, can you think of a yarn that would do nicely instead? Unfortunately Silkience has been discontinued…

Oh socks, how do I love thee, let me count the ways.

All I ever finish these days is socks. They are easy, portable, variable or not, and you can’t have too many; or, you can give them away.

I finished one pair that I’m not going to show you just yet. I’m wondering if I should maybe submit it somewhere, or just write it up and offer the .pdf for sale? Of course, it takes me ages these days to finish anything, so maybe next year I’ll have a follow-up post about that.

In the mean time, here are two ways in which I love socks.

1. Ribbed, yellow, fake fair-isle, cotton blend socks with Plymouth Sockotta. Only one shown here, but second one about 75% done.

[click photo to embiggen…]

2. Again, only one sock, but second one about 50% done, this with fatter yarn on fatter needles (#4) but the same concept. Made with Art Yarns merino sport weight, but only ~104 yds/skein, so guess what, I ran out! And now have a blue-green toe, and soon will have two.

[no embiggen option offered because it looks blurry!]

However, I will say that there has been progress on these two projects, a cable vest that still needs back shoulders and edging, and my Kimono Shawl, which has around 15 of 25 repeats knitted.

But… I’m heading off to Kinshasa again, so I may finish a sock or two (three more skeins of Sockotta await) but I don’t have big ambitions at the moment.

Mystery Stole

Jane‘s doing it.

Sarah‘s doing it.

Bonne Marie
‘s doing it.

I didn’t mean to wait till the last minute to post about this, but I was stalled by the lack of photo. And I still don’t have a photo so click on the links above to get a taste.

But I’ve been enchanted by the idea of mystery, by trusting someone and her design abilities to the extent that I don’t mind receiving only a bit piece each week. I have decided that if I ever have a child, I don’t want to know the gender till the last minute – and I will knit baby things in ALL colors, preferably not pastels – so not knowing the outcome of the stole till the last clue doesn’t bother me in the least, and gestation is much shorter.

I didn’t know about Mystery Stole 1 & 2, for which there were something like 700 and 2000 participants respectively. When I joined Mystery Stole 3, there were around 2000 members, and now it’s up to WHAT????? I JUST CHECKED IT AND THERE ARE 1400 MORE MEMBERS SINCE YESTERDAY! THERE ARE NOW 6249 PEOPLE! Yesterday there were 4600. I suspect this jump has to do with Stephanie McPhee’s post? Thankfully she’s told you all about this KAL already so I don’t feel as though I have been keeping something from you. [The reason I say this is that signups end at midnight tonight so go join!]

This stole is optionally beaded, and since I don’t have beads, I am skipping that part. I’ve chosen Schaefer Yarns’ Anne in a slate blue and grey colorway.

So, I’ve finished the first 100 rows, and lest you think I’ve been slacking, I also knit three socks for SOS2007 (see sidebar) but I’ll leave you with photos to illustrate my nonknitting activities as outlined in the previous entry.